Churches

How To Recognise Gothic Revival Church Windows

Wolverton Gothic revival churchThe 1843 church of St George the Martyr at Wolverton has lancet windows all of the same or very similar design. The roofs are all set at the same steep angle.

How Old Are Church Windows?
Part Four

This is the last part of a short series; a guide to identifying church windows.

Read this series and you will learn to recognise their type and approximate age, and from that you may be able to work out the age of that part of the church. But don’t forget, churches were commonly updated centuries after they were built with the latest windows of the time.

Continue reading "How To Recognise Gothic Revival Church Windows" »

If you have any comments or questions about this post, please leave a comment below.
If you liked this post and want to find out more about the North Bucks area, please
Subscribe


How to Recognise Classical Period Church Windows

Willen churchSt Mary’s at Willen was built in 1680 and this is the North side of the nave. Note the regular spacing and pleasant proportions. The hoodmould is an integral part of the surround, and extends all the way down to the sill.

How Old Are Church Windows?
Part Three

This is the third of a short series; a guide to identifying and dating church windows.

In these posts (there will be a total of four) you will learn to recognise their type and approximate age, and from that you may often be able to work out the age of at least part of the church, if not the whole building.

Photos of examples are all from North Bucks churches.

Continue reading "How to Recognise Classical Period Church Windows" »

If you have any comments or questions about this post, please leave a comment below.
If you liked this post and want to find out more about the North Bucks area, please
Subscribe


Naughty at Church

18th Century graffiti  Gayhurst church

The Monday Photo

St Peter’s 18th Century church at Gayhurst had been just five years old when somebody calling themselves I. Wag carved their name and age into an outside wall of the chancel.

It was 1733, and Wag claimed to be 12 years old. I bet the rector wasn’t very pleased when he found this fresh carved graffiti in the East end of the chancel.

It’s quite well and deeply carved, and must have taken a good while to do. But whoever did this bit of vandalising didn’t plan ahead and ran out of room; the letter “s” in “years” had to go under the rest of the word.

But who was I. Wag? The rector would want to find out too, but I think the carver knew this and used a false name; a wag of course is a joker, a wit. Wag is a real surname, but it’s very rare.

Without a real name to identify the offender, the rector would have suspected every 12 year old boy in the parish.

This is the earliest dated piece of graffiti I could find on the church. Wag might well have been the first to leave their mark, but they were not the last. T B (I think) carved the church in 1845, and “M. Williams (RAF)” used a pencil in 1930.

This church replaced a Medieval one that had been in a ruinous condition, probably the same one the first rector was appointed to in 1227.

If you have any comments or questions about this post, please leave a comment below.
If you liked this post and want to find out more about the North Bucks area, please
Subscribe


How to Recognise Medieval Church Windows

Chancel lancet windows  ChetwodeLancet windows in the chancel at St. Mary and St Nicholas' church, Chatwode. There are three lancets in each of the North and South walls, (you can see the edge of the South lancets on the right) and a nice set of five stained glass lancets in the East wall.   

How Old Are Church Windows?
Part Two

This is the second part of a short series; a guide to identifying church windows. In this short series you will learn to recognise their type and approximate age, and from that you may be able to work out the age of that part of the church. Usually these identifying details are just in the top section of a window.

But you will often find later windows inserted into earlier walls. For example, in Wing church there’s a 14th Century Medieval window in a 9th Century Saxon apse.

To read the other parts of this series just click on the links below:

How to Recognise Saxon and Norman Churches Windows
How to Recognise Classical Period Church Windows
How to Recognise Gothic Revival churches

Early English
1189 to 1280

Plate tracery church window at Dinton  BucksPlate tracery at the church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Dinton. I think this is a bit further along in the evolution towards bar tracery than some earlier, plainer examples. This photo replaced one of a plate tracery window from the gothic Revival period; this window is an original example.

Continue reading "How to Recognise Medieval Church Windows" »

If you have any comments or questions about this post, please leave a comment below.
If you liked this post and want to find out more about the North Bucks area, please
Subscribe


How to Recognise Saxon and Norman Church Windows

Church of All Saints  HillesdenNo, this isn't Saxon, or Norman. The windows are large, the walls thin but supported by buttresses; it's a light and airy building. This church is the result of 5-600 years of architectural progress; from the thick walls and small windows of Saxon and Norman times, to this fine example of Perpendicular architecture, All Saints at Hillesden. The photo is here so you can compare Hillesden with the Saxon and Norman windows, below.

How Old Are Church Windows?
Part One

Have you even noticed how varied church windows are?

These windows are often a big clue to the age of a church, or at least to the particular part of the church you are looking at. There have been several general periods of design over the centuries, and this is part one of a guide to these windows.

Continue reading "How to Recognise Saxon and Norman Church Windows" »

If you have any comments or questions about this post, please leave a comment below.
If you liked this post and want to find out more about the North Bucks area, please
Subscribe


Late on Church Parade

Nave and South aisle  HillesdenA typically light and airy Perpendicular period church.

Yep, I'm running late this week! (Again). It's the price of being a solo blogger; when life gets in the way the schedule suffers; there's nobody else to take up the slack. Sorry folks.

Next week will be the first of a two part post on the different periods of church window, and the many different designs. With the completed post you'll be able to date the window, if not the whole church. (there are pitfalls for the unwary, but don't worry, I'll tell you what they are)

I'd intended it to be a single post to be published yesterday, but "it was a tale that grew in the telling", another reason why I'm late, though that's no excuse. It having got so out of hand, I must now go to several churches across North Bucks to photograph their windows, so I can show you what I'm talking about.

Above is a photo that isn't going to be in that post, but does have something to do with it. See if you can work out what that is, in next week's post.

If you have any comments or questions about this post, please leave a comment below.
If you liked this post and want to find out more about the North Bucks area, please
Subscribe